Open House and PSA Testing

Open Day Poster 2018On Saturday 10th March, the Freemasons of Newbury are opening the Newbury Masonic Centre to the public as part of the #EnoughisEnough campaign. Between 10am and 3pm, the team will be in Newbury’s main shopping area, Northbrook Street, to answer questions from the public and offer them the opportunity to tour the Centre.

Enough is enough

PSA testOn the same day, from 10am until 1pm, Freemasons, as well as their friends and family, will be able to take a Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test to look for early signs of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the third biggest cancer killer in the UK after lung and bowel cancer and biggest killer of men.

The NHS describes the prostate as a “small gland in the pelvis, found only in men. It’s located between the penis and the bladder and it’s main function is to help in the production of semen”.

According to the BBC News website, although deaths from prostate cancer have been rising over the past 10 years or so, the mortality rate or the proportion of men dying from the disease has fallen – by 6% – between 2010 and 2015.

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The Berkshire masonic comunity has joned with a number of the surrounding provinces to increase awareness of the issue. We are encouraging members to discuss the issue with their male friends and family, and to consider getting tested. Testing events are being hosted at Masonic centres throughout the province over the coming year.

 

 

 

Useful information about Prostate Cancer

 

Newbury Freemasons

Newbury Lodges celebrate 300 years of Freemasonry

To celebrate 300 years of Freemasonry, the six Lodges in Newbury are hosting a party on Saturday 24th June.

As most people will know by now, Freemasons are celebrating 300 years since the formation of the United Grand Lodge of England. There are events happening up and down the country. The six Lodges that meet at the Newbury Masonic Centre have joined together to host a party at the Centre on Saturday June 24th – exactly 300 years on from the formation.

The event is open to those Freemasons meeting at the centre, their ladies and families as well as prospective members. The day is scheduled as follows

  • 10:30am – The Centre opens
  • 11am – Ceremony of Commemoration of 300 years of English Freemasonry and unveiling of a Plaque by Anthony Howlett-Bolton OBE, Deputy Provincial Grand Master and Brian Sylvester, Newbury Town Crier and local Freemason
  • 11:30am – Music by the Martin Jones Trad Jazz Band, Hog Roast and Soft Drinks
  • 2pm – close

Bring all the family to view the Masonic Time Tunnel and tour the Centre.

 

Please note that as the event will be held in the Centre and the car park, there will be no on site parking on the day. 

 

A ‘Lewis’ set to take his first step

On 20th October, the Hungerford Lodge will be performing the most important act any Lodge can, initiating a new Freemason. This particular new entrant, being the son of our Secretary, is particularly special as he is known as a Lewis – or the son of a Mason.

No one is absolutely certain why this term came to be adopted for the son of a Mason. It is thought to be derived from the device used by stonemasons to lift larger stones into place with a crane, chain block or winch.

The principle of the three-legged lewis sometimes known as St Peter's keys
The principle of the three-legged lewis sometimes known as St Peter’s keys “Wolf2” by Satrughna02 – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Wolf2.jpg#/media/File:Wolf2.jpg

According to the Library and Museum of Freemasonry – “Although [a lewis] is not a working tool used in Masonic ritual it can be seen as a symbol of strength, which a son is to his father.”

The Masonic Dictionary goes further …in the English ritual it is found among the emblems placed upon the tracing board of the Entered Apprentice, and is used in that degree as a symbol of strength, because, by its assistance, the operative Mason is enabled to lift the heaviest stones with a comparatively trifling exertion of physical power. Extending the symbolic allusion still further, the son of a Mason is in England called a Lewis,” because it is his duty to support the sinking powers and aid the failing strength of his father, or, as Oliver has expressed it, “to bear the burden and heat of the day, that his parents may rest in their old age, thus rendering the evening of their lives peaceful and happy.”

Whatever the derivation, we invite you to join us as we initiate a new Freemason and make a father incredibly proud of his son.